Google

The All Mighty Search Engine

 

In my last post, I talked some about the importance of content marketing in business. When you create interesting content you help your company stand out. Your content gets visibility through your own sharing, on social media sites, and through search engines like Google and Bing.
 

There are several ways people find your website. The first is called organic, meaning people know your web address and type it in. This usually accounts for the largest percentage of traffic on the average website. The second is refferal, someone sees your link on a different website and clicks on it. Searching for a need or service specifically, makes up a third category of website traffic, with links in marketing campaigns (email, etc.) taking fourth place. So why are search engines still the critical part of content marketing?

 

Simplicity, meaning it’s easier to type in a word or a sentence into, insert search engine here, and find what you are looking for. This goes for everyone and everything. Prospects will see your business on social media sites, especially if you connect and share your content. Yet, if someone is actively searching for a product or service, they’re most likely going to search the web. You’ve got to be visible there.

 

I said a little about who uses search engines in the above paragraph, but to embolden it, everyone uses search engines. It’s second nature now, when we want to know or find something, we Google it.
 

The algorithm is the how, what and backbone of any and all search engines. It’s what translates the sentence, “boots that won’t wear out” into 17,000,000 pages in .17 seconds. The algorithm is the maker or breaker of a web sites traffic.

 

 

Crowdfunding from the Inside Out

 

At Crowd Hydrant we help startups and entrepreneurs leverage crowdfunding for financing and to market their products and services on consignment. We also help businesses use crowdsourcing to drive innovation and reduce the cost of labor-intensive processes. We work with our customers to develop the project, pitch and rewards for these initiatives. We also provide logistical support, helping our clients deliver on their promises.
 
I‘ve spent most of my 20+ year business career in or around commercial printing and lately, everywhere I look, I see an industry in decline. Nearly every application for print has been affected by digital technology. Need to read a manual for some device? Google it. Want to see your latest phone bill? Visit your carrier’s web site. Want to read a book or magazine? Grab your tablet. Need to advertise your business? Unless you’re sitting on a big budget, search engine optimization, email, online ads, and social media – all digital technologies – are the most effective tactics.
 
A few years ago, I became intensely interested in 3D printing and recently I came to two important conclusions:
1. 3D printing is like 2D printing (the production processes are similar and both are being sold and produced online, at retail, and in-home via desktop devices)
2. 2D printers could create a future for their businesses by offering 3D print
 
As I looked around I didn’t see many people talking about this idea, so I started a blog to help evangelize 3D print in the 2D print world. 3D4printers.com was launched about 3 months ago and has been an early success. The site has had a lot of traffic and one of the articles I wrote for the site was published on TechCrunch. With that validation and momentum, I felt this was the time to seek out even more opportunity with 3D printing, which brings me to the reason for this post.  
 

What Would You Do With 25% More Productivity?

 

What could your business accomplish if your employees were 25% more productive? If your marketing and sales people were 25% more productive, how much more revenue could they generate? If your operations and administrative staff were 25% more productive, how much cost could you extract? What effect would the combined boost in revenue and reduction in cost have on your bottom line? If only there were a way, right?

A recent McKinsey Global Institute report entitled The Social Economy: Unlocking Value and Productivity Through Social Technology asserts that by fully implementing social technologies, companies have an opportunity to raise the productivity of interaction workers (high-skill knowledge workers, including managers and professionals) by 20 to 25 percent. How? Those workers currently spend 28% of their week reading and answering email, 19% searching and gathering information, and 14% communicating and collaborating internally, among other unproductive tasks. Social media treats messages as content, which can reduce - by as much as 35% - the time people spend sifting through company information. Further the tools built into social media can allow workers to collaborate much more efficiently, both inside and outside the organization.

Google+ has quietly built a huge user base and within a year become the fourth biggest social network. Since Google+ has been in operation it’s managed to build a base of 250 million users, 150 million of whom use the service monthly and 75 million who use the service daily. Google+ active users spend 12 minutes a day on the site and over 60 minutes across all Google products.