engagement

Tracking the Impact of Content Marketing

 

You can track the impact of content marketing on sales, and many companies are doing it with incredible accuracy. But, don’t expect results overnight. Remember, patience is a virtue.

The companies companies featured in this article, including Dell, L’Oreal, and Target took time to let their content seep through their communities of customers. That’s how you should consider your content when you begin to enact it in your business. What you are putting out there is important, but allowing it time to grow naturally, through your effort and your customers interests, work hand in hand. Your company is building a voice and personality with your content.

The first thing you must do is start creating content, that is first and foremost. This is the new way of marketing for an ever growing electronically connected marketplace. The longer you wait before starting, the more time competitors in your field have to connect with your target audience.

Second, do not rush your company out into the Internet with content, regardless of how good it might be. Allow yourself a steady pace, this will keep you from bombarding the social feeds. 93% of marketers use social media for business, and you don’t want to be just a point in that percentage - you want to be found! A well-paced start builds demand over time with anyone who is reading it. Further, it allows you to get a feel for what works and what doesn’t work for your company.

Finally, don’t take a one-size-fits-all approach. In the CMO.com article mentioned above, L’Oreal Americas CMO, Marc Speichert said, “What we realized is that we shouldn’t create just one piece of content that will be relevant to the majority of people. Instead we’re creating many different assets that address the specific needs of consumers.” For L’Oreal, that “implies a different content supply chain.”

 

What Would You Do With 25% More Productivity?

 

What could your business accomplish if your employees were 25% more productive? If your marketing and sales people were 25% more productive, how much more revenue could they generate? If your operations and administrative staff were 25% more productive, how much cost could you extract? What effect would the combined boost in revenue and reduction in cost have on your bottom line? If only there were a way, right?

A recent McKinsey Global Institute report entitled The Social Economy: Unlocking Value and Productivity Through Social Technology asserts that by fully implementing social technologies, companies have an opportunity to raise the productivity of interaction workers (high-skill knowledge workers, including managers and professionals) by 20 to 25 percent. How? Those workers currently spend 28% of their week reading and answering email, 19% searching and gathering information, and 14% communicating and collaborating internally, among other unproductive tasks. Social media treats messages as content, which can reduce - by as much as 35% - the time people spend sifting through company information. Further the tools built into social media can allow workers to collaborate much more efficiently, both inside and outside the organization.

Google+ has quietly built a huge user base and within a year become the fourth biggest social network. Since Google+ has been in operation it’s managed to build a base of 250 million users, 150 million of whom use the service monthly and 75 million who use the service daily. Google+ active users spend 12 minutes a day on the site and over 60 minutes across all Google products.