Dell

Tracking the Impact of Content Marketing

 

You can track the impact of content marketing on sales, and many companies are doing it with incredible accuracy. But, don’t expect results overnight. Remember, patience is a virtue.

The companies companies featured in this article, including Dell, L’Oreal, and Target took time to let their content seep through their communities of customers. That’s how you should consider your content when you begin to enact it in your business. What you are putting out there is important, but allowing it time to grow naturally, through your effort and your customers interests, work hand in hand. Your company is building a voice and personality with your content.

The first thing you must do is start creating content, that is first and foremost. This is the new way of marketing for an ever growing electronically connected marketplace. The longer you wait before starting, the more time competitors in your field have to connect with your target audience.

Second, do not rush your company out into the Internet with content, regardless of how good it might be. Allow yourself a steady pace, this will keep you from bombarding the social feeds. 93% of marketers use social media for business, and you don’t want to be just a point in that percentage - you want to be found! A well-paced start builds demand over time with anyone who is reading it. Further, it allows you to get a feel for what works and what doesn’t work for your company.

Finally, don’t take a one-size-fits-all approach. In the CMO.com article mentioned above, L’Oreal Americas CMO, Marc Speichert said, “What we realized is that we shouldn’t create just one piece of content that will be relevant to the majority of people. Instead we’re creating many different assets that address the specific needs of consumers.” For L’Oreal, that “implies a different content supply chain.”

 

Crowdsourcing Changes How We Work

 

Lately it seems crowdsourcing has caught fire. Even though the concept is not new, it’s picking up steam in the press and businesses are taking notice. While crowdsourcing can be an important tool for businesses in need of labor, it is also likely to become a bigger source of income for working people. In light of today’s economic climate, it’s relatively easy to see crowdsourcing as the full-time “job” of the future. Instead of working for a company, people will register with various crowdsourcing platforms, share their skill sets, and in return for money, pick projects and tasks that they find appealing. A clear win-win for both the enterprise and the individual.

But for businesses there can be other rewards. Engaging the crowd to assist with product development and other tasks can create an unexpected side benefit - the people who work on the project often become the organization’s most loyal advocates and its most valuable consumers. A recent article written by Bill Johnson, Dell’s Director of Global Community sums it up nicely: